Our increasing demand for power

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Imagine it’s the middle of the afternoon and your mobile phone starts bleeping, not to tell you that you have a call or a text message, but a notification and the worst type of notification ‘Low battery’. While this is very frustrating (light relief, check out this lady on a Hong Kong Subway who melts down when her phone runs out of charge, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B9FWP-8LQaQ ) there is not much we can do, other than find somewhere to charge our phone.

There is even a term getting thrown around called “Nomophobia” – the fear of being without your phone. It’s a clever play on words from “no mobile phone phobia”.

You are not alone. With our increasing reliance on mobile electronic devices we are also increasing the demand for power wherever we may be, but how far are you willing to go to charge your device?

Will you go this far to go to charge your device

In New York a member of a Broadway audience (Mr Silvestri) jumped on stage to charge his phone that only had 5% left, unlucky for this audience member the electricity socket he chose was fake as it was part of the stage set. (You can see Mr Silvestri attempt to charge his phone here, https://embed.theguardian.com/embed/video/stage/video/2015/jul/08/broadway-theater-stage-charge-phone-hand-to-god-video)

In the UK, on 10 July, a man was arrested on a London Overground train for charging his iPhone. His crime was “abstracting electricity” (an offence under section 13 of the Theft Act 1968 (http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1968/60/section/13) , which carries a maximum custodial sentence of up to 5 years). Robin Lee was arrested by British Transport Police for using an electricity socket on the train which was clearly marked “cleaners use only and not for public use”.  The full story can be read on the Guardians Website, http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/jul/13/man-arrested-charging-iphone-london-overground-train

Is this going too far? While the worst that happened to Mr Silvestri was his phone would turn off when the battery was empty, according to a forum dedicated to the London Underground (http://districtdavesforum.co.uk/thread/22086/rules-regarding-power-socket-378s) the electricity socket which Mr Lee used to charge his phone could have been susceptible to a power surge, which could have a more detrimental effect.

Restrict or Meet the Demand for power

While the statement from the British Transport Police states that Electricity sockets on Overground trains are clearly marked with the words: “cleaners use only and not for public use”. In an interview with Jeremy Vine on BBC Radio 2, Mr Lee states there was no warnings and the socket was in public access.

Whether or not that any visible plug socket should be freely used is another discussion, but there are ways of preventing unauthorised personnel from using certain sockets. This is achievable by installing ‘T-Earth’ or ‘Round Earth’ sockets, both of which would prevent a normal UK plug from being plugged in, restricting the access to authorised personnel, and protecting anyone’s whose demand for power bypasses safety warnings.

Another option would be accepting that the demand for power is increasing and make suitable charging points more widely available.

Over the last few years CMD has placed its products discreetly into different environments, allowing easy, safe access to plug sockets (UK & International), USB charging sockets, and with the introduction of our Porthole III, wireless charging. All of which brings power safely to where it is needed.

 

Over the last year DPG has placed its products discreetly into different environments, allowing easy, safe access to plug sockets (Australian & International), USB charging sockets, and with the introduction of our of our Wireless Charging module and Pyramid. All of which brings power safely to where it is needed.

 

Blog re-published with the kind permission of CMD Ltd.

 

 

 

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